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Health Canada reviews safety of drug Fibristal again following new case of liver injury

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OTTAWA – Health Canada continues to monitor safety information involving Fibristal (ulipristal acetate) as it does for all health products on the Canadian market. The Department is again reviewing the risk of serious liver injury associated with Fibristal, in response to a new international case of liver injury that led to a liver transplantation, and the European Medicines Agency’s recommendation to revoke the marketing authorization of the ulipristal acetate medication called Esmya in Europe.

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Unauthorized products may pose serious health risks (September 16, 2020: Part 1)

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Health Canada is advising Canadians about unauthorized health products that may pose serious health risks. Thetable belowis updated when Health Canada finds unauthorized health products that are promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, as a workout aid, as “poppers,” or for lightening skin or treating skin conditions (such as eczema or psoriasis). These products are labelled to contain or have been tested and found to contain dangerous ingredients. Links to previous tables with affected products are also available below.

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Unauthorized products may pose serious health risks (September 16, 2020: Part 1)

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Health Canada is advising Canadians about unauthorized health products that may pose serious health risks. Thetable belowis updated when Health Canada finds unauthorized health products that are promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, as a workout aid, as “poppers,” or for lightening skin or treating skin conditions (such as eczema or psoriasis). These products are labelled to contain or have been tested and found to contain dangerous ingredients. Links to previous tables with affected products are also available below.

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Unauthorized products may pose serious health risks (September 16, 2020: Part 1)

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Health Canada is advising Canadians about unauthorized health products that may pose serious health risks. Thetable belowis updated when Health Canada finds unauthorized health products that are promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, as a workout aid, as “poppers,” or for lightening skin or treating skin conditions (such as eczema or psoriasis). These products are labelled to contain or have been tested and found to contain dangerous ingredients. Links to previous tables with affected products are also available below.

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Unauthorized products may pose serious health risks (September 16, 2020: Part 2)

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Health Canada is advising Canadians about unauthorized health products that may pose serious health risks. Thetable belowis updated when Health Canada finds unauthorized health products that are promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, as a workout aid, as “poppers,” or for lightening skin or treating skin conditions (such as eczema or psoriasis). These products are labelled to contain or have been tested and found to contain dangerous ingredients. Links to previous tables with affected products are also available below.

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Unauthorized products may pose serious health risks (September 16, 2020: Part 2)

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Health Canada is advising Canadians about unauthorized health products that may pose serious health risks. Thetable belowis updated when Health Canada finds unauthorized health products that are promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, as a workout aid, as “poppers,” or for lightening skin or treating skin conditions (such as eczema or psoriasis). These products are labelled to contain or have been tested and found to contain dangerous ingredients. Links to previous tables with affected products are also available below.

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Hand Sanitizers and Children’s Safety: What you need to know

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Whether your child is learning from home or at school this fall, Health Canada is reminding Canadians, particularly parents and guardians, that hand hygiene is one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of germs, including COVID-19. Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. When that is not an option, Health Canada recommends using an authorized hand sanitizer that has an alcohol concentration of at least 60%. All hand sanitizer products authorized for sale by Health Canada have an eight-digit Drug Identification Number (DIN) or Natural Product Number (NPN) on the label, and are listed on the List of Hand Sanitizers Authorized by Health Canada, which is updated regularly on the Health Canada web site. Some hand sanitizers that may not fully meet Health Canada’s regulatory requirements and may not have a DIN or NPN on the label are being permitted for sale as an interim measure given the shortage of supply of hand sanitizers because of the COVID-19 outbreak. Check for these products by searching the list of Disinfectants and hand sanitizers accepted under COVID-19 interim measure.